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Webinars (all topics)

Webinars are seminars held on the web on serving survivors of torture. To see lists of webinars by topic please use the topic menu at the top of the page. Some of the webinars are available to members only, and you will have to log in to see all the webinars.
You can sort webinars by title or date recorded.

Demonstrating Client Improvement to Yourself and Others Part 2: Understanding and Using your Outcome Evaluation System

Wednesday, 18 February 2009

Greg Vinson shows how to analyze data, including step by step examples in Excel. (This webinar is part two of a three part series.)  He reviews basic statistical methods to compare means at two points in time, shows how to use Excel to conduct a t-test to identify significant difference, and calculates a Cohen’s d value to examine effect size.   Additional examples include using Chi-Square to see significance between two measures of categorical data (for example percentage of clients showing depression at two points in time) and using Correlation, to identify relationships between variables.

Demonstrating Client Improvement to Yourself and Others: Setting up an Evaluation System to Succeed

Wednesday, 17 December 2008

Greg Vinson provides a step-by-step guide to set up a data system to measure improvement in your clients. (This webinar is part 1 of a three part series.) He distinguishes continuous and categorical measures, and discusses the need to narrow your definition of a measure (goal, objective, or indicator) that you use to evaluate an outcome. He reviews steps to set up a database within Excel, including how to name variables and set up client records. He notes the need for regular intervals of collection and systematic methods to track administration of measures. Attachments for this webinar include an Excel tracking tool, to monitor administration of measures, and an Excel spreadsheet template to record client data.

Iraqi Torture Survivors: Panel Discussion with Experienced Service Providers

Wednesday, 17 September 2008

This webinar is a panel discussion that attempts to answer questions that health care providers face when working with Iraqi torture survivors. Topics include suggestions to work with clients that have deep distrust of officials, fall into social isolation, and have struggles resettling in the United States. The presenters also answer questions from the panel in regards to the emotion of Iraqis in seeking treatment from American health care providers as a result of the on-going conflict in Iraq. Also, ways to work with intra-faith (Sunni/Shia) issues in Iraqi patients.

Iraqi Torture Survivors: Assessment and Clinical Case Review

Wednesday, 13 August 2008

The first half of this webinar describes various tools that health care providers can use to determine the traumatic history of their clients. ACCESS’ PTSD scale, the Hopkins Checklist25, and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire can all be used to assess the needs of the patient. All of the forms listed in this webinar are bilingual and available on the CVT webpage.

In the second half, the presenters use an anonymous client to describe backgrounds common to Iraqi. The patient was raised by an abusive father and step-mother, and then married into an abusive marriage.

Vocational Rehabilitation with Torture Survivors

Wednesday, 30 July 2008

MANUAL

Piwowarczyk, et al. “Vocational Rehabilitation of Torture Survivors.” BCRHHR. Boston, MA: 2004. (funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement)

Download Here: http://www.bu.edu/bcrhhr/contents/contents%20may2005/courses%20for%20HP/vocational%20HP/vocational%20rehab%20stuff.pdf

BOOK CHAPTER

Piwowarczyk, L., Clark, G., Caballes, N. Vocational Considerations in Immigrants (2007). In: Walker, P. & E. Barnett (Eds.) Immigrant Medicine.  Saunders Elsevier: Philadelphia, 699-701. Book available for purchase from Amazon.com and other booksellers.

TRAINING DVD

BCRHHR.

Approaches & Clinical Experiences in Treating Iraqi Torture Survivors

Wednesday, 11 June 2008

This webinar is designed to aid health care workers and providers with usefull information on Iraqi immigrants who have survived torture and/or trauma. Understanding where the client fall on a cultural continuum is critical for the provider as it can ease the transition to western medicine and traditions. In the first dimension, clients are evaluated as Un-acculturated, Bi-cultural, and Westernized. In the second dimension, the provider must identify the ego strength, cultural identity, and family strictness in the clients they wish to assist.

Additional Resources:

Common Iraqi Attitudes on Mental Health, Responses to Trauma, and Implications for Treatment

Wednesday, 14 May 2008

Summary:

This webinar sheds light on Iraqi attitudes toward mental health treatment and response to trauma. The objectives are to identify perspectives on mental health and reasons for stigmatization of psychological distress, to describe Iraqi responses to trauma and differences with newer arrivals, and to identify key aspects of the ACCESS psychosocial rehabilitation model for torture survivors.

Managing Primary Healthcare for Torture Survivors

Wednesday, 14 May 2008

Sarah Combs developed this webinar for primary healthcare workers that work with survivors of torture on a regular basis. The first objective is to perform a health assessment prior to referral to service providers. Areas of interest could be medically neglected chronic illness, undiagnosed chronic illness, infectious diseases (including SDIs), women’s/men’s & Children’s, and preventative care vaccines.

The second objective describes the components of a referral to a provider.

Backgrounder on New Iraqi Arrivals

Wednesday, 12 March 2008

Summary:

This webinar is the first in a series related to recent Iraqi arrivals. The context is focus on the geography, religious groups, social norms, and conflicts that arise with new immigrants. The speakers identify schisms between religious factions (Shi’ite and Sunni, Muslim and Christian) that date back throughout the long history of Iraq. They also explain the Iraqi culture to help participants understand the strong cultural and family structures that they have left behind.

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