Malingering

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Tuesday, July 7th to Wednesday, September 30th

Please join us in an online, open forum on telehealth. NCB is providing an opportunity for clinicians to ask each other questions, share observations and adapted telehealth protocols for the SoT population via an online forum and technical exchange. This conversation will be a forum for peer-led informational exchange. NCB staff will assist in facilitating and monitoring the conversation.

Directions: Please watch Eugene Augusterfer’s presentation and interview Telemedicine in Mental Health first. Then feel free to join us in this open forum. All are welcome to join this forum, whether you have an account on Healtorture.org or not. For more information on using the forum, please read the directions on the first post. Please keep your comments respectful, relevant, factual, and do not share identifying information about clients per client privacy and HIPAA regulations. This forum will be open from July 6, 2020 through September 30, 2020.

Use the menu at right to explore all of the mental health evaluator training resources in this section.

Click the title of a resource below to read or leave comments, or easily share the resource.

Assessment of Malingering With Repeat Forensic Evaluations: Patient Variability and Possible Misclassification on the SIRS and Other Feigning Measures

Rogers, R., Vitacco, M. and Kurus, S. (2009), Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry Law, 38:109–14

Malingering is conceptualized as a specific response style to an adverse set of circumstances. As a situational response style, malingering is not viewed as a stable trait or enduring characteristic of feigning individuals.
This brief analysis addresses a critical concern of repeat forensic evaluations. Does the marked variability in clinical presentation, common among patients with genuine psychotic and other Axis I diagnoses, lead to false-positive findings (misclassifying genuine patients as malingerers) on repeat administration of feigning measures? Such grave errors could lead to unwarranted conclusions about malingering and undermine the foundation of a forensic report.

Link: http://www.jaapl.org/content/38/1/109.full.pdf+html

Clinical and Conceptual Problems in the Attribution of Malingering in Forensic Evaluations

Drob, S., Meehan, K., and Waxman, S. (2009), Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry Law, 37:98–106

The assessment of malingering in a forensic context is beset by a variety of clinical and conceptual difficulties that are often overlooked by forensic specialists. In the article, the authors review clinical and conceptual errors that contribute to false attributions of malingering in forensic evaluations.

Link: http://www.jaapl.org/content/37/1/98.full.pdf+html