Medical

CVT Literature Selection Q4 2021

This document is a resource for current literature, October through December, on the topic of the mental health status of and treatments for torture survivors, war trauma survivors, refugees, and asylum seekers. This also includes research in the area of social work that relates directly to the psychological well-being of these populations. The compilation below includes peer-reviewed journal article citations in these areas and links to the publicly available abstracts and full-text versions of these articles.

Caring for Newly Arrived Afghans - Free Online Course with CME

Developed by the Global Medicine at the University of Minnesota, this four-hour FREE course, composed of recorded lectures and interactive lessons, helps prepare providers to serve newly arrived Afghans. It covers topics ranging from Operation: Allies Welcome to Afghan cultural background, general and skin medical exams, and mental health care, to clinical observations from practitioners at welcome centers and in receiving states.

Please share this training opportunity with providers serving Afghans in Safe Havens and receiving states. 

Click here for more information.

CVT Literature Selection Q2 2021

This document is a resource for current literature, April through May, on the topic of the mental health status of and treatments for torture survivors, war trauma survivors, refugees, and asylum seekers. This also includes research in the area of social work that relates directly to the psychological well-being of these populations. The compilation below includes peer reviewed journal article citations in these areas and links to the publicly available abstracts and full text versions of these articles.

CVT Literature Selection Q3 2021

This document is a resource for current literature, July through September, on the topic of the mental health status of and treatments for torture survivors, war trauma survivors, refugees, and asylum seekers. This also includes research in the area of social work that relates directly to the psychological well-being of these populations. The compilation below includes peer reviewed journal article citations in these areas and links to the publicly available abstracts and full text versions of these articles.

Fundamentals: Medical Services Part 1

This lesson introduces MEDICAL SERVICES, PART 1 (31 minutes). There is no assessment at the end of this lesson. At the end of Medical Services, Part 2 there will be an Assessment that covers Parts 1 - 2. 

At the end of the three Medical Services lessons, you will be able to:

  • Identify professional and community resources used in participant’s center to meet the medical needs of survivors.
  • Describe the physical and health consequences of torture on survivors and their families.
  • Describe how the physical effects of torture impact the holistic healing process for torture survivors.
  • Describe the

Tele-Therapy Regulations

(Updated 7/1/2020)

There have been changes to teletherapy regulations due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Stay up to date with the links below. Please check your state and local regulations and verify any information before moving forward with any tele-health platform.

Tele-Therapy Software

(Updated 6/25/2020)

Below are some tele-health software and tips shared with us by a variety of different organizations through various channels including NCB's Advisory Group and our listserv. Please check your state and local regulations and verify any information before moving forward with any platform. If you would like to share information with us to post, please email Ann Lundberg, NCB Logistics and Communications Coordinator, at alundberg@cvt.org.

Physicians for Human Rights: Watch their Science-driven Solutions for Combating COVID-19 webinars

Physicians for Human Rights logo

Science-driven Solutions for Combating COVID-19: Mental Health Impacts with Dr. Gail Saltz and Dr. Kerry Sulkowicz

On April 2, 2020, in the third installment of their ongoing webinar series, “Science-driven Solutions for Combating COVID-19,” psychiatrists and PHR board members Drs. Gail Saltz and Kerry Sulkowicz held a discussion on the mental health impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. This discussion focuses on tips for self-care as we adapt to the new norms of physical distancing, working from home, and as some of us face anxieties related to the uncertainty of the pandemic. Watch their

Caring for Refugees and Survivors of Torture: Integrative Medicine, The Mind-Body Connection, and Internal Energy Arts

PRESENTER: Michael Grodin, MD – Professor of Psychiatry, Family Medicine, Bioethics, and Human Rights; Co-Founder, Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights; Medical Ethicist Boston Medical Center; Medical Acupuncturist

TOPIC: Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (Qigong, Tai Chi, Acupuncture and more) into mental health treatment of torture survivors. This webinar is 90 minutes long, and contains both a presentation, and a discussion period.

This is the first in the Advanced Clinicians webinar series.

 

Suggested discussion questions

Do you anticipate applying CAM

Improving Well-Being for Refugees in Primary Care: A Toolkit for Providers

CVT’s NEW Toolkit for Providers Working with Refugees

Meet Paw, a refugee from Burma seeking medical care in the U.S. for her headaches, nightmares and physical pain. She’s unfamiliar with the U.S. primary care system and she doesn’t speak English. Waiting alone at her first doctor appointment, Paw wonders, “How will the doctor understand me? What if I don’t like my interpreter? Will I ever be healthy again?” Paw’s questions don’t end there. They’re only a few of several listed in in CVT’s new manual, “Improving Well Being for Refugees in Primary Care: A Toolkit for Providers.”  Paw is a fictional character whose real-life experiences mirror those of clients in CVT’s Healing Hearts program.

Fundamentals: Medical Services Resources

 

Benson J, Skull S. Hiding from the sun – vitamin D deficiency in refugees. Australian Family Physician. 2007;36:355-357.

Crosby SS, Norredam M, Paasche-Orlow MK, et al. Prevalence of torture survivors among foreign-born patients presenting to an urban ambulatory care practice. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2006;21(7):764-8.

Grodin MA, Piwowarczyk L, Fulker D, Bazazi AR, Saper RB.

Dental

Torture survivors who migrate to the United States often face numerous dental needs requiring immediate periodontal care. One study which assessed the oral health status of 216 refugee torture survivors living in the United States found that 90% of the survivors required immediate intervention and 76% had untreated cavities (Singh et al, 2008).  While treatment options may be available, very few dentists receive training to address the unique demands and challenges when providing care to a vulnerable population.

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