Mental Health

The Science of Empathy, Empathic Reflection, and Empathic Regulation in Clinical Care

Scientific studies of the clinical impact of empathy have mushroomed over the past decade. The neurosciences have been linking the brain to social behaviors. For many, empathic listening to the trauma stories of torture survivors is seen as being at the heart of therapy. This webinar presents a brief overview of the history and science of empathy. The discovery of the biological basis of empathy "the mirror neurons” will be discussed.

Narrative Exposure Therapy for Torture Survivors in Exile: Overview and Adaptations

This session presents a brief theoretical and practical overview of Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET), which has emerged in recent years as a promising evidence-based treatment for PTSD in torture survivors. The presentation will assume familiarity and skill with exposure treatments and is designed for psychotherapists.  The overview covers the theoretical background for NET, basic components of the method, and references for some of the current research supporting NET.

The Self-Trauma Model

PRESENTER: John Briere, Ph.D. - Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, and Director of the Psychological Trauma Program at LAC-USC Medical Center.

TOPIC: The self-trauma model – an integrated approach to trauma treatment, including trauma theory, cognitive, behavioral, and self-psychology. Special attention will be given to incorporation of mindfulness practice.

We suggest you read the following before watching this presentation:

  • A Summary of Self-Trauma Model Applications for Severe Trauma: Treating the Torture Survivor

Caring for Refugees and Survivors of Torture: Integrative Medicine, The Mind-Body Connection, and Internal Energy Arts

PRESENTER: Michael Grodin, MD – Professor of Psychiatry, Family Medicine, Bioethics, and Human Rights; Co-Founder, Boston Center for Refugee Health and Human Rights; Medical Ethicist Boston Medical Center; Medical Acupuncturist

TOPIC: Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (Qigong, Tai Chi, Acupuncture and more) into mental health treatment of torture survivors. This webinar is 90 minutes long, and contains both a presentation, and a discussion period.

This is the first in the Advanced Clinicians webinar series.

 

Suggested discussion questions

Do you anticipate applying CAM

Non-Manualized Relational Trauma-informed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

PRESENTER: Mary Fabri, Psy.D. - Senior Director of Torture Treatment Services and International Training at the Heartland Alliance Marjorie Kovler Center; Mary has conducted training recently in Rwanda, Ethiopia and Iraqi Kurdistan

TOPIC: Implementation of a relational, non-manualized approach to Trauma-Informed Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Mary has developed and trained with this model in Rwanda.

We suggest that before watching the presentation, you read the article: Learning the Connection Between Thoughts‐Feelings‐Behaviors (attached)

 

Suggested discussion questions

How do you describe the

Therapy for Refugees and Torture Survivors: New H.E.A.R.T. Model Part 2

In this second session of this two-part series, Richard Mollica will facilitate a conversation with Dr. Sebastian Ssempijja, Ph.D. CEO/Clinic Director, Sebastian Family Psychology Practice, LLC, and Laura Morrissette MA, LMHC, a therapist with the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT) who will use case studies to share their insights on using the H.E.A.R.T. model in a clinical setting and how it might compare with using a trauma sensitive meditation instruction approach.

Now available with closed captioning.


Objectives:  

Therapy for Refugees and Torture Survivors: New H.E.A.R.T. Model Part 1

In this first session of our  Measured Impact Webinar (MIW) mini-course, "Therapy for Refugees and Torture Survivors: New H.E.A.R.T. (Healing Environment and Restorative Therapy)" Dr. Richard Mollica of the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma  introduces the H.E.A.R.T. model of care in working with survivors of torture. Dr. Mollica  describes the H.E.A.R.T. model and how the concepts contained in it may provide a different way of thinking about therapy with survivors of torture.

"Collaboration, pilot program could expand the Center for Victims of Torture’s work in MN"

An article at the Minnesota House of Representatives’ Session Daily, “Collaboration, pilot program could expand the Center for Victims of Torture’s work in MN,” quotes CVT’s Peter Dross, director of external relations, and Alison Beckman, senior clinician for external relations, and describes

Update: NCTSN Grantees Receiving Supplemental Funds for UAC Mental Health

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, NCTSN, updated their roster of grantees who received supplemental funds from Congress to provide mental health services to unaccompanied (and formerly unaccompanied) children.

New NCTSN Webinar Series - Trauma-Informed Care: Understanding and Addressing the Needs of Unaccompanied Children

Trauma-Informed Care: Understanding and Addressing the Needs of Unaccompanied Children (Available in English and Spanish)

Led by the Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center in Boston and in collaboration with the UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child

Improving Well-Being for Refugees in Primary Care: A Toolkit for Providers

CVT’s NEW Toolkit for Providers Working with Refugees

Meet Paw, a refugee from Burma seeking medical care in the U.S. for her headaches, nightmares and physical pain. She’s unfamiliar with the U.S. primary care system and she doesn’t speak English. Waiting alone at her first doctor appointment, Paw wonders, “How will the doctor understand me? What if I don’t like my interpreter? Will I ever be healthy again?” Paw’s questions don’t end there. They’re only a few of several listed in in CVT’s new manual, “Improving Well Being for Refugees in Primary Care: A Toolkit for Providers.”  Paw is a fictional character whose real-life experiences mirror those of clients in CVT’s Healing Hearts program.

Boundaries in the Electronic Age

With the cell phone, tablets, home computers, and the internet social services and health care have undergone radical changes in the last two decades. This webinar will examine ethical and professional practice issues related to this evolution in methods of communication.  Use of internet searches on clients, communication via texting, the use of blogs and help sites, friending on social media sites, will be discussed along with things which may require the development of program policies and/or standards.

Staff of all

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