Physiotherapy

or Physical Therapy, or PT

CVT Physical Therapy Survey Results

In 2014, CVT conducted a Physiotherapy Survey. Through this survey, we hoped to learn about the physiotherapists working with torture survivors, the availability of physiotherapy services, and the types of clients receiving physiotherapy services. We sent surveys to roughly 200 email addresses and received 87 responses in English, French, and Spanish. The attached report shares the compiled data and findings.

WCPT Congress - Focused symposium: Pain Management

Video of WCPT Congress 2011 - Focused symposium: Teaching people about pain Speakers: Lorimer Moseley (Australia), David Butler (Australia), Michael Thacker (United Kingdom), Adriaan Louw (United States of America) This symposium brought several world leaders in pain education together. Every physiotherapist will deal with someone in pain. Evidence demonstrates that if they understand the true biology of pain instead of an outdated understanding of pain, their outcomes will be better. Taking this symposium will enable you to gain a basic understanding of what is currently known about the biology of pain and to be familiar with principles of conceptual change theory and evidence based strategies to teach people about pain. Integration of the International Association for the Study of Pain core curriculum and modern concepts of pain biology into clinical reasoning were also addressed.

Physiotherapy as empowerment : Treating women with chronic pelvic pain

Mattsson, M., Wilkman, M., Dahlberg, L. & Mattson, B. (2000). Advances in Physiotherapy, 2(3), 125-143.
reviewed by Aaron O’Donnell, University of Minnesota doctoral physical therapy student, 2014
This article is available free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture. Please email them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and include a list of desired articles and your mailing address.
 
Background: A large group of CPP (chronic pelvic pain) patients are “inexplicable” from a medical point of view.

Psychosomatic group treatment helps women with chronic pelvic pain

Albert, H. (1999). Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 20(4), 216-225.
 
Reviewed by Brittany Burton, doctoral physical therapy candidate from the University of Minnesota, 2014. 
 
Please email them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and include a list of desired articles and your mailing address.
 
Background: In this study, group treatment for women with chronic pelvic pain based on physical, psychosomatic and behavioral therapeutic principles of treatment was assessed.

Torture Survivors: Pain Pattern and Disability

Prip, K. (2005). Lunds University. 37 pages.
This booklet is available free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture. Please email them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and include a list of desired articles and your mailing address.
This booklet was reviewed by Victor Chow, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota.
Background: In “Torture Survivors: Pain Pattern and Disability”, the researchers strived to categorize their subjective and objective findings regarding physical impairments of torture victims.

Physiotherapy and rehabilitation of the common complaints and findings in torture victims

Mayanja, F. (1996). African Centre for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture Victims. 26 pages. 
This booklet was reviewed by Stephanie Green, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014. 
The booklet is available free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture. Please email them at library@dignityinstitute.dk to request this booklet. 
Introduction
The African Centre for the Treatment and Rehab of Torture Victims in Uganda is continuing to grow and become recognized by various institutions.

Physiotherapy examination and treatment

Jacobsen et al.
Link and reference information will be posted soon.
This article was reviewed by Mark Deschepper, physical therapy doctoral student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
Introduction:
Most torture survivors complain of pain the locomotor system with many experiencing pain through all daily routines including sleep. Living with pain and performing daily tasks are significantly difficult for survivors. Physical torture leads to damage in the muscles, joints, and neurovascular system, concentration, and memory.

Interaction between patient and physiotherapist in psychiatric care : The physiotherapist's perspective

Gyllensten, A., Gard, G., Hansson, L., & Ekdahl, C. (2000), Advances in Physiotherapy, 2(4), 157-167.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, physical therapy doctoral student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
The article may be obtained free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and including a list of desired articles.
Purpose:  to investigate what factors the physiotherapy experts in psychiatric physiotherapy believed to be important in the interaction between the patient and the physiotherapist.

Survivors of torture and trauma: A special group of patients with chronic pain

Roche, P. (1992). Australian Physiotherapy, 38(2), 156-157.
This article was reviewed by a physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota. More information is to follow. 
A copy of the article may be obtained free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and including your mailing address.
This brief letter describes where physical therapists may find more information about the special needs of torture survivors as well as common sequelae from torture and recommendations for physical therapy treatment.
 
Two major sources of

Torture survivors introduction to physiotherapy: Torture and sequelae after torture

Prip, K & Amris, K. (2003), Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, 45 pages.
 
This booklet was reviewed by Brittany Burton, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
Link is to the article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture library. 
 
Introduction: Explanation of what the Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims (RCT) is and the objectives of this organization which is based in Denmark.

Muscular imbalance found in examination of posture in torture victims

Skylv,G. (1992). Poster presented at 2nd World Congress on Myofascial Pain and Fibromyalgia, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
 
This article was reviewed by Brittany Burton, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
A free copy of the article may be requested from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture, by emailing library@dignityinstiture.dk.
 
Background: The aim of torture is not only physical but psychological as well, and globally seems to be focused on the vulnerabilities of the victim.

Torture! Violence! Physiotherapy?

Faure, M. (1995). South African Journal of Physiotherapy, 5(3), 49-51.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota.
It is available free of charge by request to Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing library@dignityinstitute.dk
Background: In this brief article, a description of a four day long training seminar about physical therapy and torture was made, as well implications for physical therapy education are made. Special considerations for treating torture survivors are described.
Possible Implications for

Declaration for physiotherapists: Guidelines concerning torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment

World Confederation for Physical Therapy, (1996), Torture Quarterly, 6(4), 103.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, doctoral physical therapy student from the University of Minnesota, 2014.
The exact wording of the declaration from the 1995 World Confederation of Physiotherapy  is listed below.
  1. PTs shall not condone or participate in torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading procedures.
  2. The PT shall not provide anything to facilitate the practice of torture or other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.
  3. The PT shall not be present during any procedure during which torture or other

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