What does HealTorture.org offer Service Providers?
How do I learn about the Healing Process?
What can I learn about via Webinars or by watching Videos?
What if I am a New Employee to a program serving torture survivors?
What resources are available to Students researching the healing process of torture survivors?

Q: I came here via a link - how do I find the resource I'm looking for?
A: Type your search term in the search box in the upper right corner! 

We encourage people who are serving survivors of torture to submit resources to this website.

Group Treatment for Survivors of Torture and Severe Trauma: A Literature Review

This new literature review was coauthored by The National Capacity Building Project at the Center for Victims of Torture, the National Partnership for Community Training at Gulf Coast Jewish Family & Community Services, and an expert in the torture rehabilitation field. It was published in Torture Journal (Vol. 26 No. 1).

Group treatment is an approach that can be used with larger groups of survivors and addresses a range of treatment issues. The authors examined key clinical practice issues for group treatment, including group composition and content, facilitation, and measurement strategies. The article points to a growing interest in the topic of group treatment for survivors of torture and severe violence, providing a comprehensive picture of group-based interventions, and highlighting the need for additional research and knowledge-building.

Who Is a Torture Survivor: Understanding the Legal Definitions of Torture

Wednesday, 16 March 2016

This Measured Impact Webinar discusses the legal definitions of torture and how they apply to eligibility determinations for Survivors of Torture programs. Presenters Annie Sovcik, Marie Soueid, and Faith Ray of the Center for Victims of Torture concentrate on the legal frameworks of the U.S. and U.N. definitions of torture, as well as the refugee definition. They include examples to illustrate cases that rise to the level of torture and cases that do not.

Interpreters

Many torture survivors do not speak English as their first language, and it might be necessary to have an interpreter be part of sessions with that survivor.

Interpreters take the spoken word in one language and change it into the spoken word in a second language. (Note that a translator takes the written word in one language and changes it into the written word in a second language.) The materials on this page pertain to interpreters.

Most health-related sessions are interpreted consecutively, meaning the interpreter speaks after the provider or the survivor finishes.

Interpreter training

Listserv

HealTorture-Talk is a membership listserv that is open to all staff working in programs for torture survivors who are either ORR/TVRA grantees, members of the National Consortium of Torture Treatment Programs (NCTTP), or  ORR/TVRA staff.  It is also open to staff at ORR-funded programs, beyond those funded under the TVRA, who see survivors of torture in their work. It is sponsored by the National Capacity-building Project and funded by ORR/TVRA funds. Subscribers may be clinical or non-clinical staff. There is no limit to the number of eligible program staff who may participate.

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